Monday, 6 August 2012

Throne of Malediction - Interview

Throne of Malediction are a Black Metal/Doom duo Eric and Jessica Horner from Visalia, California.  Since forming in 2006, they have released an EP and one full-length (Ceremonial Blood).  They are hoping to release their follow-up by the turn of the year.


Throne of Malediction
Gerry:
What themes do you use for your material?

Eric:
We use a variety of themes including, horror, depressive and historical events. Mostly, our music is very much based on personal experiences in life. We have been through a lot lately in life. So it shows in our newer material especially.

Jessica:
We write whatever inspires us at the time. Lately a lot of personal subjects.

Gerry:
Is there a message that you want to get across in your music?

Eric:
I use music as an outlet for my own personal demons, I suppose. I just want people to get a "vibe" when listening to us. To feel an emotion, whether sadness, anger or happiness. I don't specifically stick to one message.

Gerry:
Please explain your recording process?  Do you have a specific way of doing things?

Eric:
We have basically done home recording from the start. It has been a learning process and I think we are finally getting results we are happy with. Jessica and I share pretty much equal songwriting credit. 

I just pretty much make a drumbeat and we build on it from there for the newer material. Build songs as we go along... Hopefully get into a real studio someday, so I don't have to do all the mixing and mastering eventually. I just do my best, as we cannot afford outside help.

Gerry:
If you were able to collaborate with anyone, who would it be and why?

Eric:
Daniel Vrangsinn and also Anders Kobro from Carpathian Forest. They are very nice people and one awesome rhythm section. If I could jam with those two, that  would be a dream come true(and I think would have great results, I daresay).  

Jessica:
I would love to do a duet with Glenn Danzig, that would be killer.

Eric and Jessica
Gerry:
Tape trading is something that just doesn’t happen anymore, how do you feel about illegal file sharing?

Eric:
I agree and disagree with it at the same time. I plan on releasing our next album in free download format. So I obviously agree its good to get music out there to the masses that way. I suppose I made a few rules for myself regarding this subject. If you have cash and you are not destitute, support your favourite artists and buy it!!! It is harder every day for bands to survive.

If you cannot find a certain album in physical format(or out of print), it can be OK to snag a download, I suppose. Or if you happen to be poor... A lot of artists offer free downloads anyways. As a fan myself, if I download a bands CD(legal or otherwise...). 

I post a blurb or two promoting them on my social network sites(Facefukk, Twatter etc.) and give them a tiny bit of free promo. If everyone who downloaded an album did that, maybe it would actually help bands. Maybe get artists a few extra sales or new fans from the word of mouth support... Just a theory...

Jessica:
There is not much I can say about it. I don't use the Internet much, except to watch You tube.

Gerry:
When did you know that music was what you wanted to do in life?  Was there a flip of the switch type moment?

Eric:
I have wanted to since I was very young.  Nothing else feels right to me, as a path though life. Just took until my mid 20's to figure out actually how to set it in motion. Instead of joining a band, it suited me to make my own (with Jessica).

Jessica:
Back when I was young and saw a video from the band Hole. Made me want to pick up guitar.

Gerry:
In your opinion, does American Black Metal differ from European?  If so, what differences do you find between the two?

Eric:
Maybe American BM has a lot more death metal and thrash influences thrown in. Overall in all genres, European music has more depth and layers than the "in your face" and brutal American style. Both have something to bring to the table however and sound great in many cases. 

Jessica:
I think there is a big divide between the two.  Mainly because of cultural and historic differences. Not to mention the personal attitude to metal. European fans seem to have more respect and knowledge of metal music. A lot of American's think of metal as a big joke.

Gerry:
It is roughly a year since the release of ‘Ceremonial Blood’.  Looking back, would you change anything on that album if you could?

Eric:
I am pretty happy with the results and songs, as first albums go. I would probably just adjust the mix a little. We actually recorded two versions of that album. A very long process, learnt a lot along the way. 

Jessica:
I would also say the production could have been a little improved. 

Gerry:
Name your three all time favourite albums. 

Eric:
That's a hard one, I like many.  I'll just name the first three I can think of...  Iron Maiden "Live After Death"(cassette version, not short CD!), Opeth "Blackwater Park" and In The Woods "Heart of the Ages" are three very strong albums I can listen to anytime. 

Jessica:
Slayer "Seasons in the Abyss", Candlemass "Epicus Doomicus Metallicus" and Amon Amarth "Versus the World"  are three albums I like a lot.

Gerry:
What is next for Throne of Malediction?

Eric:
We are planning to get gear and a few new band members as soon as possible, to play live again. Our recent fight with homelessness and relocation has set us back a bit for now. Not to mention, Jessica and I are expecting our second child very soon. In the meantime, we will continue to record. 

Our next album is almost done and we plan on releasing it with Misantrof Antirecords as a free download release.  Hopefully by the end of the year. 

Jessica:
Continue to record and write songs. And of course to play live again.

Gerry:
Finally, What advice would you give to a young band starting out today?

Eric:
I guess we are still technically a young band ourselves in some ways(though we started in 2007). My advice to new artists, is for them to be original. Don't follow trends and copycat the latest "in" band. (Trivium, Suicide Silence and Lamb of God clones a plenty!!!) 

The scene today is kind of flooded with too many bands like I mentioned before, that don't have much really to say. They just copy and repeat. Makes it harder for the innovators to get heard among the crowd. Maybe they just emulate their heroes a little too well. Music that favours technique over art is not much my style anyways.

Throne of Malediction has always strived to stick out of the pack in some ways. To try and bring something new to the table. Whether its in sound, lyrics or overall vibe. Use feelings, rather than rational thought, to make art. We have been both loved and hated for it. We don't think we are better than everyone. Just want to assert ourselves as meaningful and great sounding members of the metal underground. To be fondly remembered someday when gone.

My advice also is, if you're in it for the money, find something else. Its no sure deal to actually survive off of art. Because music is not easy money, it takes hard work and dedication to even survive these days. Being in a serious, gigging band is as hard as any day job. Its not all parties and fun. Also, open up to new ways of doing things, new technology and social sites that can help further your cause. 

I think Misantrof Antirecords (Norway) is a prime example of trying a different approach to releasing music. One reason we want to release through them. The music industry is a chaotic and ever changing beast ever since the Internet came about. I myself, still have much to learn. Just have to adapt or die...

Jessica:
To get out there and have fun with it. Try and support your fellow local bands. Who knows who may be the next one to succeed.

Throne of Malediction on Reverbnation

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