Tuesday, 29 May 2012

Ade Mulgrew - Darkest Era interview - May 2012


Ade Mulgrew - Guitar Hero


I caught up with Darkest Era guitarist Ade Mulgrew recently about his views on illegal file sharing, video promotion and tea breaks!

Gerry:
Is there a message that you want to get across in your music?

Ade:
Not one specific message, no. Each song has a different subject matter, telling one particular story or exploring one particular idea in each. There is no ideology being preached through our music; it is simply an expression of one thing or another.  

Gerry:
When did you know you wanted to play music?

Ade:
Since my mid-teens really, like most people. I started getting into 80's rock bands like Guns n Roses. The Use Your Illusion live videos blew me away and I started to listen to more and more rock and metal. Once I got into Iron Maiden, I knew I wanted to be in a band.

Gerry:
Twenty years ago bands and fans would swap cassette tapes to promote and share music.  In this current climate, where do you stand on mp3 sharing?

Ade:
The effect on bands and the music industry is definitely a shame, in terms of the loss of income to bands and the devaluing of the physical product. At the same time you can't really stop technological progress, and mp3s enable people to share more music faster than ever before, which in itself is a good thing. 

The industry has been too slow to react, to adapt to changes and find the best way to monetize this. Until this happens I think bands are going to continue to suffer. It's good in a way that anyone can get an album online now without a label or distribution, but there is this idea in society now that all music should be free, yet bands still have to pay for their studio time, equipment, etc.. it's hard to see where stability will come from unfortunately.  

Darkest Era
Gerry:
How do you feel about the use of video to promote the band?

Ade:
It's been a great promotional tool since it was invented really. I'm surprised more underground metal bands don't invest in making music videos actually. It's generally way down the list of priorities and I'm not sure why.

Gerry:
What was the biggest challenge on this record?

Ade:
It was our first full length album so I guess just stepping up to that level and adapting was a challenge in itself. We've had a lot more time in previous recordings but for this we had 14 days in which it had to be done, so there was added pressure there.

Gerry:
How would you describe the new album to someone who has not listened to you before?

Ade:
Eight tracks of epic, stormy, celtic heavy metal. Iron Maiden meets Bathory meets Thin Lizzy meets folk.

Gerry:
What was the first concert you attended and how did you feel about it?

Ade:
Iron Maiden on their Dance of Death world tour. Confirmation that I definitely wanted to be in a metal band. Other than that, I'd only been to small shows with local bands, which were inspiring too in their own way.

Gerry:
Most memorable gig?

Ade:
Ulver and Fields of the Nephilim at Hellfest.

Gerry:
Hit shuffle on your iPod and name the first 3 songs that come up, no cheating!

Ade:
  1. Bathory - The Lake
  1. Dead Can Dance - I am stretched on your grave
  1. Depeche Mode - Stripped

Gerry:
What is the band's greatest weakness?

Ade:
Tea Breaks.

The Last Caress of Light is available now via Metal Blade






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